Jerusalem has always been partly holy and partly torn by conflict and intrigue. So it was in Jesus’ time, and so it is now. In fact, one can feel the spirit-forces of good and evil battling in the sky above the city, although completely invisible to the eye.

Some tourists fall prey to “Jerusalem Syndrome.” Previously agnostic, they are suddenly overcome with religious fervor and are taken to Israeli psychologists on call to treat that specific malady.

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Jerusalem is the vortex of earth. It was the site of the crucifixion and resurrection of Christ, and will be the site of the final battle between the righteous and the wicked, into which Christ will descend and conquer.

I had a testimony of Jesus Christ before I came here. But when I was 16, I didn’t even know there was a God. My first prayer, urged upon me by Mormon missionaries, was “Is there anybody up there”? There is. He answered me. And He has answered me many, many times since. Through the grace of Jesus Christ, I have been healed from many ailments, taught the sweet doctrines of His kingdom, spiritually comforted, and even emotionally healed from a childhood of abuse.

But to walk in Jerusalem doesn’t mean you are walking in the footsteps of Jesus. Many days I feel like singing, “I walked today where Caiaphas walked.” The world is ever with us. No. One must have a guide to find the footsteps of Jesus. Winding through the alleys of the city, across wadis to Jericho, and along the shores of Galilee, the lasting imprint of Christ’s footfall is spiritual. The best guide is a prophet.

Now, with a living prophet as my guide, I ever walk in the footsteps of Christ. I have traveled the world, and He has always been by my side. I feel His love. He knows me molecule by molecule and thought by thought. He guides me through the Holy Ghost, ever speaking to my mind and heart. I testify that He lives. He is the creator of the universe, but intimately involved with the smallest of His creations, willing to be with me minute by minute.

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Jerusalem has always been partly holy and
partly torn by conflict and intrigue.  So it was in Jesus’ time, and
so it is now.  In fact, one can feel the spirit-forces of good and
evil battling in the sky above the city, although completely invisible
to the eye.Some tourists fall prey to “Jerusalem Syndrome.”  Previously agnostic,
they are suddenly overcome with religious fervor and are taken to
Israeli psychologists on call to treat that specific malady.Jerusalem is the vortex of earth.  It was the site of the crucifixion
and resurrection of Christ, and will be the site of the final battle
between the righteous and the wicked, into which Christ will descend
and conquer.

I had a testimony of Jesus Christ before I came here.  But when I was
16, I didn’t even know there was a God.  My first prayer, urged upon
me by Mormon missionaries, was “Is there anybody up there”?  There is.
He answered me.  And He has answered me many, many times since.
Through the grace of Jesus Christ, I have been healed from many
ailments, taught the sweet doctrines of His kingdom, spiritually
comforted, and even emotionally healed from a childhood of abuse.

But to walk in Jerusalem doesn’t mean you are walking in the footsteps
of Jesus.  Many days I feel like singing, “I walked today where
Caiaphas walked.”  The world is ever with us.  No.  One must have a
guide to find the footsteps of Jesus.  Winding through the alleys of
the city, across wadis to Jericho, and along the shores of Galilee,
the lasting imprint of Christ’s footfall is spiritual.  The best guide
is a prophet.

Now, with a living prophet as my guide, I ever walk in the footsteps
of Christ.  I have traveled the world, and He has always been by my
side.  I feel His love.  He knows me molecule by molecule and thought
by thought.  He guides me through the Holy Ghost, ever speaking to my
mind and heart.  I testify that He lives.  He is the creator of the
universe, but intimately involved with the smallest of His creations,
willing to be with me minute by minute.